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Unleashing the Power of Your Serratus Muscles: Anatomy, Risks, and Exercises


The human physique is a captivating piece of engineering, with each sinew, bone, and organ coordinating in a labyrinthine dance to keep us erect and in motion. Amidst the many muscles that comprise this intricate system, the serratus anterior and serratus posterior muscles are often overlooked.


In this blog post, we'll delve into a closer inspection of the serratus anterior and serratus posterior muscles, including their anatomy, evolutionary history, hazards of modern lifestyles, typical pain conditions and injuries, exercises for prevention.


Anatomy of the Serratus Anterior and Serratus Posterior Muscles


The serratus anterior and serratus posterior muscles reside on either side of the thoracic cage, amidst the scapula and the vertebral column. The serratus anterior muscle is located on the front of the ribcage and adheres to the scapula, while the serratus posterior muscle is situated on the back of the ribcage and clings to the spine. These muscles are accountable for steadying the shoulder blade and enabling a broad spectrum of shoulder and arm movements.


The serratus anterior muscle is split into three parts: the superior, intermediate, and inferior parts. The superior part is responsible for elevating the shoulder blade, whereas the intermediate part is responsible for protracting the shoulder blade. The inferior part is accountable for depressing the shoulder blade.


The serratus posterior muscle is also divided into three parts: the superior, intermediate, and inferior parts. The superior part is accountable for elevating the ribs, while the intermediate part is accountable for depressing the ribs. The inferior part is responsible for elevating the spine.


Evolutionary History of the Serratus Anterior and Serratus Posterior Muscles


The serratus anterior and serratus posterior muscles have been evolving for millions of years. They were originally developed in fish as a means to stabilize their pectoral fins and enhance swimming ability. As fish evolved into amphibians and then reptiles, these muscles continued to evolve, ultimately resulting in the range of shoulder and arm movements we possess today.


Hazards of Modern Lifestyles for the Serratus Anterior and Serratus Posterior Muscles


In contemporary life, we spend extensive periods sitting and employing our arms and shoulders in repetitive movements, such as typing or carrying heavy loads. This can lead to contraction and tension in the serratus anterior and serratus posterior muscles, causing pain and discomfort in the shoulders, neck, and upper back.


Typical Pain Conditions and Injuries of the Serratus Anterior and Serratus Posterior Muscles


One of the most frequent pain conditions associated with the serratus anterior and serratus posterior muscles is scapular winging. This condition arises when the muscles weaken or become overused and are unable to properly stabilize the shoulder blade, causing it to protrude from the back. This can lead to pain, discomfort, and difficulty with shoulder and arm movements.


The muscles known as the serratus anterior and serratus posterior are prone to a common injury called strain or tear. This type of injury is typically caused by overuse or sudden, forceful movements that apply undue stress to the muscles. When a strain or tear occurs, symptoms such as pain, weakness, and limited mobility in the shoulder and arm may develop.


To prevent pain and injury in these muscles, it is essential to maintain their strength and flexibility through various exercises. For instance, foam rolling can help alleviate tension and improve flexibility, while wall slides can strengthen the serratus.


You can order your personalised exercise plan here: https://www.janmi.co.uk/fitnessplans


The serratus anterior muscle is particularly important for stabilizing the scapula during movement. It originates from the first eight or nine ribs and inserts into the medial border of the scapula. Its primary role is to protract and stabilize the scapula, which is necessary for shoulder abduction and upward rotation.


It is crucial to note that before engaging in any new exercise regimen, it is advisable to consult with a healthcare professional. Furthermore, while these exercises can be beneficial for preventing and treating common injuries and pain conditions associated with the serratus anterior muscle, they may not be suitable for everyone.


Besides exercise, maintaining good posture, avoiding overuse of the shoulders and upper back, taking breaks throughout the day to stretch and move around, using proper lifting techniques, and steering clear of activities that require repetitive overhead motions are also essential for preventing injury.



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